Moving Expenses Deductions & Digital Nomads

It’s been a busy few months around here. My family moved from Phoenix, Arizona to Omaha, Nebraska to be closer to my family and experience seasons once again. We bought a very neglected 60-year old house in an awesome neighborhood. It’s already proving to be a money pit, but we’re excited to fix it up and make it our forever home.


Cow posse not included.

We started thinking about moving to Omaha nearly two years ago when we visited my family during Halloween. The autumn weather, real pumpkin patches (as opposed to dozens of trucked-in pumpkins tossed on the desert floor with a few hay bales thrown in for aesthetics), and trick-or-treating in the neighborhood my dad grew up in made us long for a place that felt more like home.


Although we loved our little home in Phoenix, we were never fans of Arizona. Brian grew up in the mining town of Elko, Nevada and I grew up in Las Vegas. We met in Reno before moving to Phoenix for four years. Despite all of this, both of us feel “at home” here. For me, it’s because my dad grew up here – lives in the house he grew up in, in fact. I visited my grandparents here often. My parents, two of my brothers, my sister, and nephew are all here, within a five-minute drive. Brian enjoys the cooler weather, trees, and short commute.

So when Brian saw that an ad agency here in Omaha was looking for a new Art Director, he applied and landed the job.

Brian’s relocation for a new job means we’ll get to take advantage of the tax deduction for moving expenses. My freelance writing business moves with me. It got me thinking about whether digital nomads can benefit from the tax breaks for moving, so I wrote about it for Forbes last month.

Give it a read and let me know: What’s the last big move you made and why?

Image credit: Dominik Lange via Unsplash


Tax Return Filing for On-Demand Workers

Last year, I wrote a blog for Henry + Horne about how slow the IRS has been to adapt to the on-demand economy. In it, I quoted a report from the Kogod Tax Policy Center that found:

  • 1/3 of on-demand workers did not know whether they were required to file quarterly estimated tax payments
  • 36% were not familiar with the kinds of records they would need to maintain to substantiate income and expenses for their work
  • 43% had no idea how much they would owe in tax for their on-demand work and had not set aside money for taxes
  • 1/2 were unfamiliar with deductions and credits that could be used to offset their self-employment income


(Image: Dan Gold via Unsplash)


Last year, I worked with a young lady that drove for one of the ride-sharing companies and got into a bit of tax trouble. It seems she never received a 1099 from the company and wasn’t aware that the money she made was taxable income, so she didn’t do a good job of tracking expenses. A couple years later, she received a notice from the IRS telling her she owed thousands of dollars in back taxes, interest, and penalties.

Fortunately, we were able to help her recreate her records enough to have some documented expenses to offset that income and get her tax bill lowered. But the situation just reinforced how little information many of these workers receive about the tax implications of the gig economy.

So I was excited to write this piece for Credit Karma Tax, providing step-by-step instructions for on-demand workers to file their tax return – for free! – using Credit Karma Tax.

All you need to do is sign up for a free Credit Karma account and follow the instructions to report business income from any 1099-MISCs and 1099-Ks you receive from any ride-share companies and any income you earned from ride-sharing work that wasn’t reported on a 1099.

If you know anyone working in the gig economy, feel free to pass this along!

Can a Balance Transfer Hurt Your Credit Score?

I recently wrote a piece for Magnify Money on how a balance transfer affects your credit score. Did you know that a balance transfer can drop your credit score by about 40 points initially? Does this mean you shouldn’t take advantage of those 0% balance transfer offers?pexels-photo-259200

Check out the full piece on the Magnify Money blog and let me know what you think!

(Image: via Pexels)